Step back in time to see 65 years of Land Rover gruelling expeditions 

The all-new Land Rover Defender is – without doubt – the most eagerly-anticipated four-wheeled arrival in 2020.

Hitting showrooms this year, the durable 4X4 will keep with traditions with the option of a three-door Defender 90 and five-door Defender 110, with prices starting from £40,290.

But before it has been offered up to a long list of keen customers, the SUV has been subject to one of the most extreme offroad tests to ensure it’s up to whatever task drivers put it to, taking on the unforgiving landscape of Namibia in West Africa.

Such tests of endurance are nothing new for the British marque, which has been putting its hardened 4X4s against the elements for years.

Some 65, in fact. Step back in time with us in this picture special to see ten of the best.

2020 – New Land Rover Defender in Namibia

The New Slovakia-built Defender faced its toughest challenge yet this year, as four vehicles tackled a 686km route Kaokoland in Namibia, known as ‘the land God made in anger'

The New Slovakia-built Defender faced its toughest challenge yet this year, as four vehicles tackled a 686km route Kaokoland in Namibia, known as ‘the land God made in anger’

From towering sand dunes to bone-dry riverbeds, it was a four-day expedition across some of the world's toughest terrain in scorching temperatures

From towering sand dunes to bone-dry riverbeds, it was a four-day expedition across some of the world’s toughest terrain in scorching temperatures

Across large rock crawls, packed sand and deep waterways the Defenders made slow and steady progress. Ideal for taking in all the nature...

Across large rock crawls, packed sand and deep waterways the Defenders made slow and steady progress.

Ideal for taking in all the nature…

At one point the expedition tackled Van Zyl's pass, built by Dutch explorer Ben van Zyl in the ‘60s, and littered with large rocks, loose gravel and steep descents of up to 35 degrees

At one point the expedition tackled Van Zyl’s pass, built by Dutch explorer Ben van Zyl in the ‘60s, and littered with large rocks, loose gravel and steep descents of up to 35 degrees

From Van Zyl's pass, the expedition headed to Marienfluss and the Skeleton Coast National Park

From Van Zyl’s pass, the expedition headed to Marienfluss and the Skeleton Coast National Park

Stretching 500km along the Atlantic, the waters of the Skeleton Coast are renowned for strong currents, sharp rocks, shifting sandbanks and thick fog, leading to the beaches being littered with ghostly remains of ships

Stretching 500km along the Atlantic, the waters of the Skeleton Coast are renowned for strong currents, sharp rocks, shifting sandbanks and thick fog, leading to the beaches being littered with ghostly remains of ships

2017 – Land Rover Discovery 5 in Peru

In recent years, the current Discovery has been used on the Land Rover Experience (LRE) Tours, tackling far-flung destinations and tricky off-road challenges

In recent years, the current Discovery has been used on the Land Rover Experience (LRE) Tours, tackling far-flung destinations and tricky off-road challenges

In 2017, LRE Tours took on Peru across two six-day stages. How about this for a photo of the terrain being tackled en route?

 In 2017, LRE Tours took on Peru across two six-day stages.

How about this for a photo of the terrain being tackled en route?

The off-road expedition headed through the Peruvian mountains, jungles and desert toward the ancient Inca city of Machu Pichu, 4,200 metres above sea level in the Andes Mountains

The off-road expedition headed through the Peruvian mountains, jungles and desert toward the ancient cities of india Inca city of Machu Pichu, 4,200 metres above sea level in the Andes Mountains

Once again, the gruelling feat was accomplished in stock vehicles with only a few minor genuine Land Rover accessories added

Once again, the gruelling feat was accomplished in stock vehicles with only a few minor genuine Land Rover accessories added

 2013 – Range Rover Hybrid, from Solihull to Mumbai

Land Rover Hybrids in London

Land Rover Hybrids in India

In an extreme engineering validation test, Land Rover employees set off from Land Rover’s UK home at Solihull to drive the 16,800km extended Silk Trail, arriving in Mumbai, India, 53 days later

The mission took the vehicles through Europe and into Central Asia, passing the mythical Silk Trail cities of Bukhara and Samarkand on their way to the ultimate challenge - the Himala

The mission took the vehicles through Europe and into Central Asia, passing the mythical Silk Trail cities of Bukhara and Samarkand on their way to the ultimate challenge…

...the Himalayas. In the high altitudes of the Tibetan plateau, the Range Rover Hybrids entered a technical unknown

…the Himalayas.

In the high altitudes of the Tibetan plateau, the Range Rover Hybrids entered a technical unknown

Pushed into thinning air at 5,000m, the reduced atmospheric pressure put engines and cooling systems to the ultimate test.

Pushed into thinning air at 5,000m, the reduced atmospheric pressure put engines and cooling systems to the ultimate test.

2012 – Land Rover Discovery 4, from Birmingham to Beijing, China

In 2012, the one millionth Discovery built started the 'Journey of Discovery' from its birthplace in Birmingham to Beijing in China - one of Land Rover's fastest growing markets

In 2012, the one millionth Discovery built started the ‘Journey of Discovery’ from its birthplace in Birmingham to Beijing in China – one of Land Rover’s fastest growing markets

The 50-day, 8,000-mile adventure was undertaken by three Land Rover Discovery vehicles

They traveled through more than a dozen countries across Europe and Central Asia

The 50-day, 8,000-mile adventure was undertaken by three Land Rover Discovery vehicles travelling through more than a dozen countries across Europe and Central Asia, culminating at the Beijing motor show on 23 April

The challenge followed in the tyre tracks of 'The First Overland Expedition' of 1955, in which a team in Series 1 Land Rovers set out from Birmingham to Beijing

The challenge followed in the tyre tracks of ‘The First Overland Expedition’ of 1955, in which a team in Series 1 Land Rovers set out from Birmingham to Beijing

Land Rover Discovery in the snow

Land Rover Discovery on the road

That expedition had to divert to Singapore, but in the spirit of the original challenge the Discovery will be crossing many of Land Rover’s major markets including the UK, Russia and China

2006 – Land Rover Discovery 3 completing the G4 Challenge in Thailand, Laos, Brazil and Bolivia

Designed as a successor the Camel Trophy (which appears later in this list), the G4 Challenge ran in 2003 and 2006

 Designed as a successor the Camel Trophy (which appears later in this list), the G4 Challenge ran in 2003 and 2006

In the latter running (pictured), Discovery 3 vehicles were used, totally unmodified apart from the fitment of some genuine Land Rover accessories

 In the latter running (pictured), Discovery 3 vehicles were used, totally unmodified apart from the fitment of some genuine Land Rover accessories

Some 18 nations competed in the Challenge, tasked with crossing Thailand, Laos, Brazil and Bolivia (pictured)

 Some 18 nations competed in the Challenge, tasked with crossing Thailand, Laos, Brazil and Bolivia (pictured)

A total of 39 Discovery 3s were used for the event, all of which made it to the end unscathed - despite the extreme terrains

A total of 39 Discovery 3s were used for the event, all of which made it to the end unscathed – despite the extreme terrains

The 4,000km route took 28 days to complete, including climbing mountains in Bolivia, traversing the jungles of Laos and the urban jungles of Rio de Janeiro and Bangkok

 The 4,000km route took 28 days to complete, including climbing mountains in Bolivia, traversing the jungles of Laos and the urban jungles of Rio de Janeiro and Bangkok

 1998 – Land Rover Discovery 2 Trek, from London to Paris 

The introduction of Discovery 2 was a baptism of fire, with two pre-production models taking on a Trek challenge of over 30,000km

The introduction of Discovery 2 was a baptism of fire, with two pre-production models taking on a Trek challenge of over 30,000km

The journey spanned from London to Paris, via Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, India, Sydney, central America and more

The journey spanned from London to Paris, via Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, India, Sydney, central America and more

Departing from London on June 1st 1998, the Discoverys were driven across western and eastern Europe to Istanbul

Departing from London on June 1st 1998, the Discoverys were driven across western and eastern Europe to Istanbul

The next leg of the trip then took then via Turkey, Iran, Pakistan and India where they were shipped to Australia

The next leg of the trip then took then via Turkey, Iran, Pakistan and India where they were shipped to Australia

The teams had to deal with temperatures above 50C as well as hair raising road hazards. These included gun-toting militia, ox-carts, unlit overloaded trucks, camels and monkeys before culminating in Paris

The teams had to deal with temperatures above 50C as well as hair raising road hazards.

These included gun-toting militia, ox-carts, unlit overloaded trucks, camels and monkeys before culminating in Paris

1995 – Range Rover on the Hannibal Trail 

Where Hannibal crossed the Alps with elephants, Land Rover decided to opt for Range Rovers instead. Recreating Hannibal's famous journey from France into Italy via the Alps, this expedition included a gruelling 85 miles of off-roading through forests and up rocky climbs to more than 3000m above sea level

Where Hannibal crossed the Alps with elephants, Land Rover decided to opt for Range Rovers instead.

Recreating Hannibal’s famous journey from France into Italy via the Alps, this expedition included a gruelling 85 miles of off-roading through forests and up rocky climbs to more than 3000m above sea level

With newly upgraded electronic suspension and a new long wheelbase chassis, the Hannibal Trail expedition was designed to showcase the capability and refinement of the second-generation Range Rover

With newly upgraded electronic suspension and a new long wheelbase chassis, the Hannibal Trail expedition was designed to showcase the capability and refinement of the second-generation Range Rover

The convoy of cars headed across Mount Cenis, near to the ski resort of Val d'Isere

The convoy of cars headed across Mount Cenis, near to the ski resort of Val d’Isere

1972 – Range Rover on the Trans-America Expedition 

The Trans-America expedition took in the full 18,000-mile length of the American continent from Alaska to Cape Horn, using two Range Rovers provided by British Leyland to the British Trans Americas Committee

The Trans-America expedition took in the full 18,000-mile length of the American continent from Alaska to Cape Horn, using two Range Rovers provided by British Leyland to the British Trans Americas Committee

Although an 18,000-mile expedition is a challenge in itself, the Range Rovers were in uncharted territory when it came to the Darien Gap…

Although an 18,000-mile expedition is a challenge in itself, the Range Rovers were in uncharted territory when it came to the Darien Gap…

The Darien Gap is a 250-mile stretch of swamp and impenetrable jungle, preventing all road traffic from passing between the north and south parts of the American continent

The Darien Gap is a 250-mile stretch of swamp and impenetrable jungle, preventing all road traffic from passing between the north and south parts of the American continent

The expedition took a full 99 days to fight their way through this stretch alone

The expedition took a full 99 days to fight their way through this stretch alone

The expedition took place between December 1971 and June 1972, led by Col John Blashford-Snell

The expedition took place between December 1971 and June 1972, led by Col John Blashford-Snell

1972 – Land Rover Discovery I on the Camel Trophy, USSR 

In 1990 the Land Rover Discovery I took on a gruelling 1,000-mile expedition through the USSR as part of the Camel Trophy

In 1990 the Land Rover Discovery I took on a gruelling 1,000-mile expedition through the USSR as part of the Camel Trophy

The trek travelled across some of the most remote terrain on earth, starting in Bratsk, then travelling south to Kob, through the vast Tiga Forest via Kachug to Lake Biakal, then west to the finish at Irkutsk on the Angara River

The trek travelled across some of the most remote terrain on earth, starting in Bratsk, then travelling south to Kob, through the vast Tiga Forest via Kachug to Lake Biakal, then west to the finish at Irkutsk on the Angara River

The Camel Trophy ran with Land Rover Discovery I vehicles from most of the decade, spanning from 1990 to 1997

The Camel Trophy ran with Land Rover Discovery I vehicles from most of the decade, spanning from 1990 to 1997

Land Rover Disxcover I crossing Lake Biakal

Land Rover Disxcover I crossing Lake Biakal

Other events retraced famous routes in Tanzania, Burundi, Mongolia, Paraguay, Chile and more

As many as 17 competitors took part in each Camel Trophy event, traversing rivers and winching out of muddy ravines in the ultimate test of durability

As many as 17 competitors took part in each Camel Trophy event, traversing rivers and winching out of muddy ravines in the ultimate test of durability

1955 – Land Rover Series I on the Oxford and Cambridge Far Eastern Expedition

This 1955 expedition, comprising six students from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, was a ‘world first', capturing the imagination of an international audience thanks to three films commissioned by David Attenborough. Two Land Rover Series I vehicles travelled over land from London to Singapore, apart from the English Channel and the Bosphorus

This 1955 expedition, comprising six students from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, was a ‘world first’, capturing the imagination of an international audience thanks to three films commissioned by David Attenborough.

Two Land Rover Series I vehicles travelled over land from London to Singapore, apart from the English Channel and the Bosphorus

The Series I cars were straight off the production line with a few minor modifications, including spotlights, winches and extra fuel tanks. They faced some major hurdles along the way, including the desert between Damascus and Baghdad, which took 14 hours alone in sweltering temperatures

The Series I cars were straight off the production line with a few minor modifications, including spotlights, winches and extra fuel tanks.

They faced some major hurdles along the way, including the desert between Damascus and Baghdad, which took 14 hours alone in sweltering temperatures

They also tackled the famous Ledo road between Burma and India and requiring the crossing of hundreds of streams and rivers, constantly keeping an eye out for thieves and headhunters

They also tackled the famous Ledo road between Burma and India and requiring the crossing of hundreds of streams and rivers, constantly keeping an eye out for thieves and headhunters

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The internationally-renowned Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in London has today revealed it will consider whether to remove a statue of its founder Sir Thomas Guy – but will not change its name – as a senior minister backed a Black Lives Matter campaign to topple upwards of 70 monuments to slave traders

The internationally-renowned Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in London has today revealed it will consider whether to remove a statue of its founder Sir Thomas Guy – but will not change its name – as a senior minister backed a Black Lives Matter campaign to topple upwards of 70 monuments to slave traders.

Sir Thomas helped set up the hospital near London Bridge in 1721 having made his fortune in the 17th and 18th centuries as a major shareholder of a company selling slaves to the Spanish Colonies. 

Today Guy’s and St Thomas’ welcomed Mayor of London Sadiq Khan’s review of statues and street names in the capital and said the future of its own monument to its founder outside the Guy’s building should be considered.  

A spokesman said: ‘We recognise and understand the anger felt by the black community and are fully committed to playing our part in ending racism, discrimination and inequality’, adding: ‘There are no plans to change the name of the hospital’. 

Today Boris Johnson’s Business and Industry Minister Nadhim Zahawi, who was born in Iraq and moved to the UK with his Kurdish parents aged nine, said there should be no statues of slave traders in Britain.

Mr Zahawi said they should not be torn down illegally like Edward Colston’s in Bristol, but said: ‘Any slave trader should not have a statue.

But I wouldn’t be breaking the law to take statues down, it should be done through our democratic process. It should be up to local people to decide what they want to do. If the majority of people decide that we want the statues down, then they should be taken down’.

Now at least 72 memorials honouring colonial figures have been targeted for destruction of activists on its ‘Topple the Racists’ website and yesterday they forced the removal of 18th Century slave dealer Robert Milligan from outside the Museum of London in West India Quay, Docklands. 

The removal of a statue of the so-called ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’ Sir Thomas Picton from Cardiff city hall is nearing success as all of Labour’s 130 UK local authorities agreed to draw up a list of controversial statues in their communities which could be ripped down after Edward Colston’s was destroyed in Bristol on Sunday.  

Cardiff City Council’s leader Huw Thomas has backed the campaign to rip it down calling it an ‘affront’ to black people in the Welsh capital because he executed dozens of slaves.

He was even put on trial in England for illegally torturing a 14-year-old girl – extremely rare at the turn of the 19th century – but after being convicted he successfully appealed. 

While noting Picton’s statue commemorated his part in the Napoleonic Wars and being the highest ranking officer to die at Waterloo, Councillor Thomas said: ‘The growing awareness and understanding of the brutal nature of his governorship of Trinidad and his involvement in slavery makes it, in my view, very difficult to reconcile his presence in City Hall’. 

A 25ft obelisk dedicated to him on the outskirts of Carmarthen town centre, which has been there since 1888, is also subject to a petition for removal.

It stands on Picton Terrace, which also faces calls to be renamed. 

There are at least five statues of two-time British prime minister Sir Robert Peel also under threat because his MP father, also called Robert Peel, campaigned for slavery to continue.

His son is considered the father of the modern police, after setting up the Met as Home Secretary in 1829. Some BLM supporters are also angry because of his links to policing. 

As debate rages over the future of many of Britain’s most famous monuments, it has also emerged:

  • Boris Johnson reiterated that ‘black lives matter’ to him during fiery PMQs with Sir Keir Starmer;
  • Colston’s School in Bristol is considering changing its name after statue of Edward Colston was torn down on Sunday;
  • Oxford University chancellor Chris Patten accuses Cecil Rhodes statue protesters of ‘hypocrisy’ because imperialist’s trust funds scholarships for 20 African students a year;
  • An Oxford-educated museum curator tweets to BLM supporters instructions on how to destroy statues with household chemicals – and says next target should be memorial to Winston Churchill’s Parliament Square statue;
  • Football hooligans and far-Right activists have called for a ‘ring ancient cities of india steel’ around Churchill and the Cenotaph this weekend as Tommy Robinson slams ‘soft-handed police’ ahead of more protests;
A statue of Sir Thomas Guy, sits outside Guy's Hospital,  which he founded in 1721 with £19,000 of his own money, equivalent to £2million today. Today the NHS Trust admitted it would consider its removal in a review set up by Sadiq Khan demands it because he made his money from slavery. Former bookseller Thomas Guy made his fortune through the ownership of shares in the South Sea Company, which had a monopoly on trafficking slaves to Spain's colonies in South America in 1713

A statue of Sir Thomas Guy, sits outside Guy’s Hospital,  which he founded in 1721 with £19,000 of his own money, equivalent to £2million today.

Today the NHS Trust admitted it would consider its removal in a review set up by Sadiq Khan demands it because he made his money from slavery. Former bookseller Thomas Guy made his fortune through the ownership of shares in the South Sea Company, which had a monopoly on trafficking slaves to Spain’s colonies in South America in 1713

The next to fall? This tribute to Sir Thomas Picton in Cardiff City Hall is expected to fall after the council's leader also demanded its removal

There are at least five statues of two-time British prime minister Sir Robert Peel also under threat because his MP father, also called Robert Peel, campaigned for slavery to continue. Sir Robery Peel is also known as the 'Father of Modern Policing' after he set up the Metropolitan Police Force in 1829.

The next to fall?

This tribute to Sir Thomas Picton in Cardiff City Hall is expected to fall after the council’s leader also demanded its removal.  There are at least five statues of two-time British prime minister Sir Robert Peel (right in Parliament Square) also under threat because his MP father, also called Robert Peel, campaigned for slavery to continue

An aerial view of the Sir Thomas Picton obelisk on Picton Terrace in Camerthen, Wales, which is also on the BLM supporters' hit list. Picton was known as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad' owing to his brutal regime as governor of the Caribbean island. In 1806 he was convicted of ordering the illegal torture of a 14-year-old girl, Louisa Calderon. A charge that was later overturned.

An aerial view of the Sir Thomas Picton obelisk on Picton Terrace in Camerthen, Wales, which is also on the BLM supporters’ hit list.

Picton was known as the ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’ owing to his brutal regime as governor of the Caribbean island. In 1806 he was convicted of ordering the illegal torture of a 14-year-old girl, Louisa Calderon. A charge that was later overturned.

At least 72 memorials honouring colonial figures have been targeted for destruction of activists on its 'Topple the Racists' website and yesterday they forced the removal of 18th Century slave dealer Robert Milligan from outside the Museum of London in West India Quay, Docklands

At least 72 memorials honouring colonial figures have been targeted for destruction of activists on its ‘Topple the Racists’ website and yesterday they forced the removal of 18th Century slave dealer Robert Milligan from outside the Museum of London in West India Quay, Docklands

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A coastal town in southwestern India, a medieval city in Portugal and a region in the northern Philippines which is home to the world’s most famous sunsets were the most discussed destinations on TripAdvisor over the past year

A coastal town in southwestern India, a medieval city in Portugal and a region in the northern Philippines which is home to the world’s most famous sunsets were the most discussed destinations on TripAdvisor over the past year.

The travel website on Tuesday announced the winners of its 2020 Travellers’ Choice Destination awards, which recognise the places which have seen the biggest increases in positive reviews and ratings.

Kochi, a port city in southwestern India, enjoyed the biggest spike in five-star reviews, ratings and traveller interest on TripAdvisor over the last year.

It was closely followed by Luzon, a lush green region in the Philippines which is home to the capital Manila, and Porto, a historic city in northern Portugal filled with winding cobbled streets and some of the world’s finest wine cellars.

Two little known Brazilian cities, one coastal and one high atop inland mountains, also featured in the top 10, alongside popular Indonesian and Vietnamese resorts and a Greek island which has been a tourist favourite for decades.

Australia received special mention in the ‘Emerging Destinations’ category, where the Northern Territory capital of Darwin was recognised for its historical attractions, waterfront dining and thrilling encounters which allow you to get up close and personal with a crocodile.

The coastal town of Kochi in southwestern India and the medieval city of Porto in Portugal (pictured) were the most discussed destinations on TripAdvisor over the past year

The coastal town of Kochi in southwestern India and the medieval city of Porto in Portugal (pictured) were the most discussed destinations on TripAdvisor over the past year

1.

KOCHI, INDIA 

A blending of small, ancient cities of india villages along India’s southwestern coast created modern day Kochi, where sunset strolls, dining on fresh fish from seaside vendors and boat rides through the islands offshore are all part of the charm. 

While visitors to India traditionally prioritised trips to better known cities like Delhi and Mumbai, seasoned travellers are now venturing to Kochi for its vibrant cafes, art galleries and historic colonial sites, including beautiful Portuguese-built churches and forts.

2. LUZON, PHILIPPINES

The northern region of Luzon boasts landscape and biodiversity like nowhere on earth, prompting travellers to journey to the largest island in the Philippines for a truly unique holiday experience. 

Luzon is home to Manila, the country’s bustling capital, but its the scenery of vast mountains, rain forests, miles-long beaches and coral reefs that draw the crowds.

Seasoned travellers are now venturing to Kochi (pictured) for its vibrant cafes, art galleries and historic colonial sites, including beautiful Portuguese-built churches and forts

Seasoned travellers are now venturing to Kochi (pictured) for its vibrant cafes, art galleries and historic colonial sites, including beautiful Portuguese-built churches and forts

3.

PORTO, PORTUGAL

Set on the Douro River in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest cities in Europe with many of its buildings declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1996. 

Filled with twisting cobbled streets, the 600-year-old Sao Francisco Church and some of the world’s finest wine cellars, its fast becoming the number one city break for European travellers.

4.

PORTO SEGURO, BRAZIL

With 55 miles of white sand beaches, it’s little wonder wanderers are increasingly drawn to Porto Seguro in the state of Bahia, northeastern Brazil. 

Colourful architecture, affordable restaurants and accommodation and a quaint town centre are some of the draw cards, along with the pristine Porto Seguro beach.

The beach is close to a port where you can catch the ferry to Arraial d’Ajuda, an idyllic holiday resort just over 35 minutes away.

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Stars reveal where they want to go once coronavirus crisis is over

Travel has come to a halt and no one quite knows when it will start moving again. But that shouldn’t stop us planning our next trip.

In fact, the lockdown might open up new possibilities for many of us and create a stronger desire to get going.

Here are the dream destinations of some people in the public eye — and how you can emulate them.

Felicity Kendal – The Good Life actress yearns for the calm of coastal India

The Good Life actress Felicity Kendal says she longs to return to a hideaway she loves in the Indian resort of Goa, pictured

The Good Life actress Felicity Kendal says she longs to return to a hideaway she loves in the Indian resort of Goa, pictured 

Felicity, pictured, says she loves staying in a 'posh five-star hotel'

Felicity, pictured, says she loves staying in a ‘posh five-star hotel’ 

I totally love a posh five-star hotel and I am a complete tart for turn-down service, but all I am craving right now is less: just nature, family and simplicity. When this chaos is over I long to return to a hideaway I love in Goa.

We go as a family and rent a few basic little bungalows on a stretch of sandy beach shaded by palm trees. 

No room service, wi-fi, or television, and no amplified man-made sounds

It is just the birds at dawn and the cicadas at night.

How to do it: A beach holiday at a four-star resort hotel in Goa costs from £1,300pp this winter with Goa Experience (

Chris Tarrant  – radio and television presenter Chris dreams of an African safari

TV host Chris Tarrant can't wait to get back on an African safari in the stunning Kruger National Park, pictured, in South Africa

TV host Chris Tarrant can’t wait to get back on an African safari in the stunning Kruger National Park, pictured, in South Africa 

Chris says hearing the roar of a lion while on safari is 'unforgettable'

Chris says hearing the roar of a lion while on safari is ‘unforgettable’ 

I’ll head for the Sabi Sands game reserve in South Africa’s Kruger National Park. 

Hearing a mighty lion roar is unforgettable: the booming noise can literally make the ground shake.

Elephants mating, giraffes fighting, monkeys screaming out as a predator approaches, huge crocodiles sliding into the water and hippos honking. It’s all there. 

And woe betide anyone who comes between a hippo and its water hole.

How to do it: A four-night stay at the Chitwa Chitwa Private Game Lodge in the Sabi Sands game reserve with Indigo Safaris (

Fly with British Airways (

Britt Ekland – the actress would escape the UK’s capital to be with family in her native Sweden

Britt Ekland says she would love to go back to her native Sweden to be with her family. Pictured is the capital, Stockholm

Britt Ekland says she would love to go back to her native Sweden to be with her family. Pictured is the capital, Stockholm

Britt is currently in London with her 'darling dog' Bowie

Britt is currently in London with her ‘darling dog’ Bowie 

I am in London with my darling dog Bowie. 

But I would like to go back to my house by the sea in Sweden and be with my grandchildren. 

I would teach them how to row my rubber dinghy and how to use the tractor to cut the grass neatly in perfect rows.

How to do it: Baltic Travel Company offers an eight-night fly-drive holiday. 

You can visit Dalarna, Stockholm and Gothenburg for £1,085pp.(Bernardine Evaristothe joint winner of last year’s Booker Prize has her eyes on Bali

The winner of last year's Booker Prize, Bernadine Evaristo, would love to visit Bali, pictured, as it 'sounds so exotic'

The winner of last year’s Booker Prize, Bernadine Evaristo, would love to visit Bali, pictured, as it ‘sounds so exotic’ 

I’ve wanted to visit Bali for years. It just sounds so exotic. 

I’d see the historical sites, take massages, go to yoga classes . . . and just chill.

How to do it: A seven-night stay at Club Med Bali’s idyllic beachside retreat (

Lorraine Kelly – the TV presenter longs for an Antarctica adventure

Ushuaia in Argentina is where GMB host Lorraine Kelly would love to sail from towards Deception Island on the Antarctic peninsula

Ushuaia in Argentina is where GMB host Lorraine Kelly would love to sail from towards Deception Island on the Antarctic peninsula 

Lorraine says she was lucky enough to go to Antarctica to follow in the footsteps of Sir Ernest Shackleton

Lorraine says she was lucky enough to go to Antarctica to follow in the footsteps of Sir Ernest Shackleton

Three years ago I was lucky enough to go to Antarctica, where I followed in the footsteps of the explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton. 

He is my hero, and I want to go back — sailing from Ushuaia in Argentina to Deception Island on the Antarctic peninsula.

This is one of the most beautiful places on the planet, teeming with wildlife and so clean, pure and calm. 

I will enjoy again the solitude and look out on cathedral-like icebergs, thousands of penguins and gargantuan whales.

How to do it: PolarQuest (

Carina Lepore – last year’s winner of The Apprentice dreams of taking her son to Florida’s Walt Disney World

Apprentice winner Carina Lepore says she would love to visit Walt Disney World in Florida post-lockdown

Apprentice winner Carina Lepore says she would love to visit Walt Disney World in Florida post-lockdown 

We’d love to visit Disney World and some of the other Florida theme parks in the area. 

We’d go on all the rides, enjoy the sunshine and tuck into fast food.

How to do it: A seven-night visit to Walt Disney World, Orlando, taking in Disney’s All Star Resorts, with Virgin Holidays (

Jeffrey Archer – the author plans to visit Japan

Author Jeffrey Archer can't wait to visit Tokyo as he was due to travel there this summer for the Olympics, but it has been postponed

Author Jeffrey Archer can’t wait to visit Tokyo as he was due to travel there this summer for the Olympics, but it has been postponed 

Jeffrey says that he finds Tokyo fascinating and loves exploring the 'fabulous gardens'

Jeffrey says that he finds Tokyo fascinating and loves exploring the ‘fabulous gardens’ 

I was due to visit Japan this summer for the Olympics, so my number one goal is to go there once this is all over.

I have visited Japan about six times and I adore it. I even accompanied Margaret Thatcher there in 1993. 

I love the people. They are generous, warm, reliable and well-disciplined. 

Tokyo is always fascinating, and I do enjoy exploring the fabulous gardens and temples. Japanese food is glorious, especially kobe beef.

How to do it: A 12-night stay in Japan, visiting Tokyo, Hiroshima and Kyoto, is from £5,625pp with Abercrombie & Kent (

Carol Drinkwater – the actress-turned-author dreams of returning to the South Seas island where she tied the knot

Author Carol Drinkwater dreams of returning to Aitutaki in the Cook Islands, which is surrounded by a 'magical turquoise lagoon'

Author Carol Drinkwater dreams of returning to Aitutaki in the Cook Islands, which is surrounded by a ‘magical turquoise lagoon’ 

This month is mine and my French husband Michel’s 32nd wedding anniversary. 

So I would like to return with him to the place we were married, Aitutaki, a tiny island in the outer Cook Islands in the South Pacific.

It has a magical turquoise lagoon surrounded by a reef, where we swam before and after our wedding ceremony. Heaven on earth.

How to do it: A 15-day tour of the Cook Islands, taking in Aitutaki, with the Ultimate Travel Company (

Neil Oliver – television presenter and archaeologist Neil plans to head to New Zealand’s South Island

TV presenter Neil Oliver is yearning for the great outdoors, in particular New Zealand. Pictured is Fiordland National Park

TV presenter Neil Oliver is yearning for the great outdoors, in particular New Zealand. Pictured is Fiordland National Park

I’d head for New Zealand with my wife Trudi and our three children — being stuck between four walls recently has made me yearn for ‘the great outdoors’, and there’s a lot of that in New Zealand. 

I like the idea of going somewhere far, far away, beyond the horizon.

How to do it: A five-day tour of South Island, taking in the Fiordland National Park, with Thrifty Tours (

John Simpson – veteran BBC broadcaster John plans to return to Zimbabwe

Veteran BBC broadcaster John Simpson would like to go back to one of his favourite countries, Zimbabwe. He would start his trip at Victoria Falls, pictured

Veteran BBC broadcaster John Simpson would like to go back to one of his favourite countries, Zimbabwe. He would start his trip at Victoria Falls, pictured 

Zimbabwe is one of my favourite countries — peaceful and full of lovely people who enthusiastically welcome visitors. 

My wife, son and I would start a trip at Victoria Falls, then head to Hwange National Park, which is host to 100 species of mammals and 400 species of bird. 

Zimbabwe has some problems, but people there know how to look after you and show you a wonderful time.

How to do it: A three-day safari at Hwange National Park followed by two nights at Victoria Falls Hotel costs from £1,800pp with Expert Africa (

Carol Vorderman – the former Countdown maths whizz wants to go for a gallop on the beaches of Wales

The beaches of the Gower Peninsula is the location that maths whizz Carol Vorderman is visiting post-lockdown

The beaches of the Gower Peninsula is the location that maths whizz Carol Vorderman is visiting post-lockdown 

Carol says she likes to 'walk in her scruffs for miles' along the cliffs

Carol says she likes to ‘walk in her scruffs for miles’ along the cliffs

The beaches of the Gower Peninsula in South Wales are calling, where I will visit my friend, the horse trainer Christian Williams. 

His horses run on the beaches, which is a beautiful sight.

I also like to kayak, paddle-board, cadge lifts in lobster boats and walk in my scruffs for miles along the rugged clean wild cliffs.

How to do it: A cottage for two people on the Gower Peninsula costs from £300 for seven nights with Gower Holidays (Olivia Williams – the actress would happily swap country tranquility with her family for cities and crowds

Actress Olivia Williams would love to travel across Europe, taking in cities such as Paris, Rome (pictured) and Seville

Actress Olivia Williams would love to travel across Europe, taking in cities such as Paris, Rome (pictured) and Seville 

Travelling across Europe by train to all the great cities, meeting up with people along the way, is my dream.

In Paris, I would do a group hot yoga class, then go to the Rodin Museum, followed by boeuf bourguignon at my favourite restaurant in the 6th arrondissement.

Then my sister and her family would join me in Rome. I’d meet my husband in Venice by the Grand Canal. After that Berlin, then Budapest, Amsterdam, Vienna and Seville . . .

How to do it: The four-week Adventurer rail pass (

Ian Rankin – the best-selling crime writer has set his heart on a tour of South Africa’s famous winelands

Author Ian Rankin says that Franschhoek in South Africa, pictured, has great restaurants and vineyards all around

Author Ian Rankin says that Franschhoek in South Africa, pictured, has great restaurants and vineyards all around 

Ian says that Franschhoek also has great scenery

Ian says that Franschhoek also has great scenery 

I’d fly out to South Africa with my wife Miranda. We’d spend a couple of days in Cape Town, then rent a car and drive to the winelands, basing ourselves in Franschhoek for a few days. 

It has great restaurants and vineyards all around. Gorgeous scenery, too.

From there we’d drive to Hermanus, making sure we’ve timed the trip to coincide with whale migration season. 

You can watch these vast majestic creatures from the promenade — that’s how close they are.

How to do it: A ten-day tour of South Africa’s winelands, taking in Stellenbosch and Cape Town, with BK Wine Tours (

Miriam Stoppard – the doctor, author and agony aunt, dreams of escaping to a Buddhist paradise in the Himalayas

Doctor and agony aunt Miriam Stoppard wants to head to Bhutan and found her last trip there 'moving and nourishing'

Doctor and agony aunt Miriam Stoppard wants to head to Bhutan and found her last trip there ‘moving and nourishing’ 

I would head to Bhutan, with its monasteries and dzongs in the Himalayas. It’s the only Buddhist country I’ve ever visited and it was such an eye-opener.

The Buddhist philosophy embraces all of life, and I found my trip there so moving and nourishing; I love the simple life they practice.

Their priority isn’t money, it’s happiness. They even have a National Day of Happiness — a commodity in decidedly short supply in the world right now.

How to do it: A tailor-made 12-day visit to Bhutan, taking in the Tiger’s Nest monastery overlooking the forested valley and other fortified monastic complexes at Punakha, with TransIndus (

Nigel Planer – actor and comedian Nigel is planning a trip to Japan to see its ‘Great Gardens’

Actor and comedian Nigel Planer is planning a trip to Japan to visit the likes of Kyoto, pictured, and Kanazawa

Actor and comedian Nigel Planer is planning a trip to Japan to visit the likes of Kyoto, pictured, and Kanazawa 

I’d love to go to Japan, which I once visited briefly. One of the things I like about it is that’s it’s so organised, which isn’t like me at all.

I’m more of a ramshackle person, and that’s part of the attraction for me and my wife Roberta, my ideal companion.

The trains are magnificent: on time, spacious and the litter bins never overflow.

The spoken language is so logical, not like English which is all over the place. And the gardens are beautiful. I’d visit the moss gardens in Kyoto and Kanazawa.

I’d also go to Kamakura, an ancient cities of india town east of Tokyo famous for its shrines and temples. Lastly, I’d hit the beachy part in the south.

Now that would be interesting to see how the Japanese do beach holidays.

How to do it: A ten-night Gardens of Japan tour with Japan Journeys (

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Gold
Gold
Trading Gold for Salt
Trading Gold for Salt

Ancient Ghana: A Trading Empire

Possibly the main factor that kept this city

alive, was trade. Archeologists can easily picture what trading in Ghana was

like. The promotion of Ghana’s foreign trade has been central to all government

plans to revive the economy since 1983. Ghana’s reason to trade was thought to

be because it provided much needed resources. These included devaluing the

currency as well as raising producer prices for crucial exports such as cocoa,

salt and gold, kola beans, and different virgin materials. The taxes were run

by the king. He collected taxes off every single trade item that entered the

city. This included slaves, and domesticated animals. Some of the items that

were shipped through trade routs were nuts and berries, leather and ivory,

nuggets, iron, cloth and cotton, hides, and wood. Although most of the items

Ghana traded were harvested, most of them fell under the major categories: salt

and gold. Reason salt and gold were so popular, is because first of all, they

were easy to find, often in caves or underground digging mines. These were

harvested by miners and many other people. Alone, salt supported and replaced

what is lost in sweat. This was especially important in hot and humid places.

Trading salt was what made Ghana such a rich empire. In fact, one pound of salt

in Ghana would cost as much as 25 dinars, about 100 ounces of gold. Gold alone

was important because it was worth a lot of money, and since Ghana had no

trouble finding it, it also made the city rich. Most families wore gold as

jewelry. Gold was so popular and plentiful in Ghana, that it was said that

there was a 60 pound gold nugget near the king’s throne, worth over $300,000

dollars today! Places over 60 miles away would come and trade for Ghana’s

resources that provided both food and fashion. But these were not all they

traded. Slaves were especially important in Ghana because they completed jobs

without payment while Ghanaians were away. Slaves were also the only permanent

citizens. A healthy man could cost up to 20 dinars (84 grams of gold) and a

good female cook could cost 100 dinars or more. Ghana ran one of the most

successful tax systems. Ghana’s administrators were very sufficient and kept

the empire together. Transportation of goods were done by camels because they

adapted to desert travel and could go days without food or water. In final

words, trading was a very resourceful and helpful way of life.

Ghana in Pictures (Visual Geography (Twenty-First Century))

Ghana in Pictures (Visual Geography (Twenty-First Century))

 

Ancient Ghana Masks
Temple Pyramid
Temple Pyramid
Camels for Transportation
Camels for Transportation

African women statue water carriers Ghana sculpture New (The Digital Angel Decor)

African women statue water carriers Ghana sculpture New (The Digital Angel Decor)

 

Ancient Ghana Tools

Trading was not the only key that helped Ghana’s empire, building tools was also useful. Some of the most common tools found in the remains of Ghana were weapons. Ghana also had farming tools such as sickles, knives, and scissors. Some tools in Ghana were actually invented by the Ghanaians. This included machines that ran on a few natural resources. Seed oil, coal, and other things. Blacksmiths were in charge of all the building and hammering. Tools were relatively hard to make because they went through a complex procedure of smelting, hammering and cooling. Only the most skilled builders were capable of doing all this. They were highly respected. Tools were made out of many common materials such as wood, gold, rock, weeds, etc. Other less common materials were silver, rubber, and different kinds of metals. But out of all, the most important of all is iron. Iron was probably the best metal for tools such as weapons and sharp cutting utensils. This is because iron was strong and durable. It could be easily bended to make sharp and deadly arrowheads, lances, blades, and knives. They also lasted longer. These were much better than the wooden arrows before, and were some of the greatest tools some could find. Of course, digging for iron also helped raise the standard form of agriculture. Even as these weapons became more powerful, they also cost more than other weapons. This created protection and provided money for Ghana. Ghana used many of the modern tools we use today. Some of the oldest known tools in Ghana’s history were scissors, sickles, knives, axes, and hammers. Some tools such as the bow, or a popular instrument that used dried melons as keys, were hand crafted and didn’t require any hard work. Ghana did not have a wide range of tools. Most were used for building. And some were used for farming. In final words, the tools Ghana made were very useful and extraordinary.

Ancient Ghana Weapons

Ghana Pottery
Ghana Pottery

Ghana (Bradt Travel Guide)

Ghana (Bradt Travel Guide)

 

Ancient Ghana Art

Despite tools, art was another thing Ghana

specialized in. Ghana had many types of art: Terra Cotta, clay, jewelry,

pottery, and occasionally, abstract. Ghanaians enjoyed making art, and showing

off to gods. Ghanaians believed that a person who specialized in art was given

a gift from god. Art symbolized many beliefs and served as an offering to holy

structures. Some types of art we find from Ghana are made form live plants such

as leather, grass, roots, and herbs. Some are also made of clay, gold, and iron

slabs. The reason Ghana used this skill was to please others. Some craved

respect and so practiced making art to get people to admire then. But statues

and jewelry were not all they made, some also painted. Although painting was

not very popular in Ghana, many Ghanaians made a mixture of berry juice and oil

resins. This created a medium blue paint. They used this paint to decorate

pottery after firing, and stain cloth and clothing. Some of the most highly

respected artistry, are smiths, kinds of smiths are black furnace smiths,

clack smiths, and worker smiths. They were very valuable because they were said

to have “magical powers”. They made what is called an invisible barrier which

protected them. Ghana said that their work shrouded in mysticism. They were

called the first sons of the earth. They also acted as protectors for all the

people. AS you can see, art was very skilled at the arts and had a priority to

many skills.

In conclusion, Ghana was a very unique city because of its skills and culture. Trading in Ghana began to get very popular after tales of the spirit snake, Ogadu-bida died. Gold and salt was what Ghana was most known for. We also discussed about what tools Ghana used and the art of making them. Lastly, art in Ghana was simple but somewhat complex. Ghana was a normal to advanced city. Although they were not much different than surrounding cities, they invented and ran a very advanced tax system. So though Ghana was like any other place, it taught archeologists a lot about ancient trade and daily life is West Africa.

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Indian martial artists stack up in a nine-person 'sandwich'

A group of Indian daredevils have broken the record for the highest number of layers in a ‘nail sandwich’.

In the bizarre clip, Vispy Kharadi is seen lying down while men in white t-shirts take it in turns to assemble the structure on top of him in Surat, Gujarat in India.

The subject stares up to the ceiling as though he is trying to hold his concentration and withstand the heavy weight.

Men in white t-shirts help lower and layer the participants at the event in Surat, Gujarat in India.

The group show faces of pure agony as they wait for the final count-down before being allowed to be disassembled

Vispy Kharadi and eight martial artists broke the record for the highest number of layers in a ‘nail sandwich’ on October 23

Moments later, five layers of sharp nails and men are seen leaning back on to the man, each holding their own trays comprising of four to six inches facing upwards.  

Six men carry walk up the makeshift stage and lower another man on top of the human tower, on October 23.

One of the men clutches onto his bed of nails and grunts through gritted teeth as he tries to manage the last few minutes of holding the structure

One of the men clutches onto his bed of nails and grunts through gritted teeth as he tries to manage the last few minutes of holding the structure

Dressed in matching attire, they lie patiently for the four to six inches of layers to be placed on them

Dressed in matching attire, they lie patiently for the four to six inches of layers to be placed on them

A group of men lift participant's, walk up to the makeshift stage and then lower them on to the structure

A group famous things of Surat men lift participant’s, walk up to the makeshift stage and then lower them on to the structure

The camera scans upwards and the group of nine, who appear to be from the Spaartan Fitness and Martial Arts group, seem unphased as they clutch their trays of nails initially.

Suspenseful music fills the room of clapping spectators and builds tension as the thrill-seekers edge closer towards the title of achieving a Guinness World Record.

A man, dressed in a karate-style outfit stands next to the soaring structure and begins a count down to see if they can keep their balance.

Moments later, one of the participant’s shows a face of pure agony and shuts his eyes.

His face is sweating while other’s lean next to him and offer words of encouragement.

One of the first martial artists who climb aboard the nail sandwich is captured staring up to the ceiling as though he is trying to hold his concentration to get through the challenge

One of the first martial artists who climb aboard the nail sandwich is captured staring up to the ceiling as though he is trying to hold his concentration to get through the challenge

The group stripped down to their trousers as they screeched with cheer while holding their Guinness World Record Certificate, on Wednesday

The group stripped down to their trousers as they screeched with cheer while holding their Guinness World Record Certificate, on Wednesday

The pair posed for a photo before joining the rest of the group on stage

As the final contender was lifted to his feet, the room erupted into cheer and they pulled each other into a hug

A pair of the contender’s embrace eachother after successfully completing the challenge, earlier this week

Another man’s face turns a brighter shade of pink and he waves a thumbs up at the man who appeared to be leading the session.

He tries to hide his pain and makes a few grunts through his gritted teeth.

They hold the completed formation for a minimum of one minute once the top weight was placed on the last person.

Seconds later, the group who lowered the men, unravel the structure and lift them off one another.

As the final participants is lifted to his feet, the room erupts into cheering and clapping.

They whistle and wave their arms in to the air before getting a group picture with the their Guinness World Record certificate.  

Mr Kharadi also took the record for most iron bars bent with the neck in one minute. 

His team previously beat the record of eight, set by themselves, last year and won the World Record for five layers in 2011. 

 

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10 Most Beautiful Cities in India

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So here are the beautiful cities in India for you to visit:

If we think of a nation more diverse than India, we will find it very difficult. An ultimate travel goal, India has such a great amount to offer. From the southern conditions of Goa and Kerala to the dusty desert strongholds of Rajasthan, there is something very mysterious and charming about this extraordinary and intriguing Asian monster.

Srinagar

As we call it Venice of the East Srinagar is the biggest city and Summer Capital of Jammu and Kashmir. It is located on the banks of the Jhelum River, a tributary of the Indus, and Dal and Anchar lakes. Dal Lake is the most known tourist spot in the valley’s paradise.

Best time to visit: Somewhere between April to November is the best time to plan a trip to Srinagar.

Udaipur

The recent capital of the Mewar realm, Udaipur is affectionately known as the city of lakes. The city gives a brief look into the regal past of the Rajput rulers and their lavishness. The strong posts and castles in this spot will take you on a joyride into the historical backdrop of the nation.

Best Time to Visit: The greatest months to visit are September, October, November, December, February and March.

Varanasi

Varanasi or Banaras is a city of marvelous Temples and Ghats. It is among the Sapta Puries, which means seven sacred cities of ancient cities of india India. Varanasi is calmness in mid of chaos, the more one experience it, the more one becomes addicted to it.

Best Time to Visit: The best time to visit Varanasi is Winter (November – February). The temperature is low and a quiet breeze favors it all through the day.

Mysore

The Royal capital of the Princely State of Mysore, the city keeps up its regal appeal till today. Mysore is additionally one of the most well-known weekend spots from Bangalore. The Mysore Palace was worked out of wood in 1897 and is maintaining its reputation of craftsmanship. As sunsets, the royal residence is lit up to make an extraordinary glow.

Best Time to Visit: Mysore has a tropical atmosphere, however, the best time to visit Mysore is from the Monsoons and Winter a long time from July to February.

Hampi

Hampi also is known as “Heritage City of India” is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. On the south bank of the River Tungabhadra it has the seventh century Hindu Virupaksha Temple and a cut stone chariot remains before the colossal Vittala Temple site.

Best Time to Visit: The winter an exceptionally significant time-frame of October to February is the best time to visit Hampi.

Chandigarh

Settled at the lower regions of the Shivalik extend, this greenest city of India is an ideal mix of innovation and quietness and warmth.

The close by Rock Garden is a recreation center highlighting figures made of stones, reused earthenware production and mechanical relics.

The best time to visit Chandigarh is between the long periods of October and March when the climate is agreeable and is good for a city visit.

Agra

Agra is known for the seventh wonder of the world – the notorious and eventually noteworthy Taj Mahal.

Aside from the Taj, the city is additionally home to various other antique architecture including palaces and royal residences of Mughal era.

August to October: August denotes the start of Monsoon in Agra and is an incredible time to enjoy the Taj Mahal in its rain-washed beauty.

Gangtok

Gangtok city is a nice combination of training, the travel industry and business. It has a solid Tibetan culture and it leaves its hints all around the city. The scenery there is stunning and the cultural is well explained by the locals.

The best time to visit Gangtok is among October and mid-December. A spectacular view of the Himalayan Range is guaranteed during this time.

Shillong

It is known as the ‘Scotland of the East’ because of its hitting closeness with the Scottish Highlands. Shillong is additionally known for the love of music and the same number of noticeable performers have hailed from this spot.

The evening view of Police Bazar is a colourful sight to enjoy, the Khasi women in their pretty attires, hot momo stalls and sun setting beside the hills.

Walk to June: March and April see the approach of summers however the climate is still very wonderful.

Guwahati

Last yet not the least Guwahati is a rambling city next to the Brahmaputra River and is the portal to the Seven North-eastern States.

It’s known for heavenly locales like the Kamakhya Temple, Madan Kamdev and Hazo (Hindu Shrines of Shiva and Vishnu).

October to April is the best time to visit Guwahati since the city is honoured with a sticky subtropical atmosphere. One should plan their visit around the Bihu celebrations during April, January and September-October, to see a one of a kind and charming side of Assam.

With more than 1600 cities in India, it is not fair to list down just ten. Each city here has charm and history of its own. Indeed, they may not be too clean or maybe a little unsafe but possesses the worth of visiting once. Hope you all get that one chance to experience it yourself.

Happy Travelling !!!

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