People reveal the VERY strange sights they've seen at airports

Waiting patiently at an airport for a flight to depart may be boring for some, but others use it as a time to observe people’s rather unusual quirks. 

has compiled snaps of some of the funniest and most memorable moments travellers from across the globe have witnessed while preparing for their trips. 

Some of the amusing sights include a passenger wearing a bike helmet, a man practicing yoga in the departure lounge, and a woman who appears to be flashing her bottom – thanks to an unfortunately placed travel pillow. 

Elsewhere, an exhausted little girl can be seen flopped over the top of a suitcase, while being pulled along by her guardian.  

Travelling in style: This savvy plane passenger, from an unknown location, opted to wear a bike helmet for her journey, presumably in order to avoid catching coronavirus from her fellow travellers

Travelling in style: This savvy plane passenger, from an unknown location, opted to wear a bike helmet for her journey, presumably in order to avoid catching coronavirus from her fellow travellers

What better way to say namaste to your fellow passengers than a spot of yoga in the departure lounge? This yoga-enthusiast is pictured at an unknown location

What better way to say namaste to your fellow passengers than a spot of yoga in the departure lounge? This yoga-enthusiast is pictured at an unknown location

Exhausted: This tired little girl, from an unknown location, expertly managed to stay on top of a suitcase as she hitched a ride through the airport

Exhausted: This tired little girl, from an unknown location, expertly managed to stay on top 10 airports in Indiatop 10 airports in Indiatop 10 airports in India of a suitcase as she hitched a ride through the airport

Double take: Some passengers were shocked when they saw this woman, in an unknown location, walking past them - thankfully it turned out to be her travel pillow

Double take: Some passengers were shocked when they saw this woman, in an unknown location, walking past them – thankfully it turned out to be her travel pillow

Welcome home: Although you are only able to make out one word on this little girl's sign, people in the arrivals lounge, at an unknown location, were impressed by her efforts

Welcome home: Although you are only able to make out one word on this little girl’s sign, people in the arrivals lounge, at an unknown location, were impressed by her efforts

This family, from an unknown location, attempted to protect themselves from coronavirus by placing placing plastic bags over themselves while queuing at the airport

This family, from an unknown location, attempted to protect themselves from coronavirus by placing placing plastic bags over themselves while queuing at the airport

That can't be comfy! Another couple, from an unknown location, came up with a clever way to be each other's cushions as they took a nap

That can’t be comfy! Another couple, from an unknown location, came up with a clever way to be each other’s cushions as they took a nap

You are now safe to disembark: The replacement captain for this flight to an unknown destination was happy to be allowed up in the cockpit - and provided a wonderful greeting for his passengers

You are now safe to disembark: The replacement captain for this flight to an unknown destination was happy to be allowed up in the cockpit – and provided a wonderful greeting for his passengers

Oops, didn't see you there: Bizarrely, despite their sheer size, these enormous planes, believed to be in the US, managed to back into one another while on the runway

Oops, didn’t see you there: Bizarrely, despite their sheer size, these enormous planes, believed to be in the US, managed to back into one another while on the runway

Needs must: This woman, from an unknown location, appeared to be so desperate for some shut eye that she used her suitcase to prop herself up

Needs must: This woman, from an unknown location, appeared to be so desperate for some shut eye that she used her suitcase to prop herself up

These children, believed to be from the US, were desperate for their mother to return home from her trip  - for more reasons than one!

These children, believed to be from the US, were desperate for their mother to return home from her trip  – for more reasons than one!

And just to prove that travelling can do bad things to all of us, this comical snap of a jetlagged-looking Nicholas Cage with a smiling fan, from an unknown location, will almost certainly brighten your day

And just to prove that travelling can do bad things to all of us, this comical snap of a jetlagged-looking Nicholas Cage with a smiling fan, from an unknown location, will almost certainly brighten your day

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In pursuit of the lonely planet: CHASING VENUS: THE RACE TO MEASURE THE HEAVENS BY ANDREA WULF

In pursuit of the lonely planet

CHASING VENUS: THE RACE TO MEASURE THE HEAVENS BY ANDREA WULF (Heinemann £18.99)

Thrill of the chase: Venus (the small dot on the face of the sun) during its last transit in 2004

Thrill of the chase: Venus (the small dot on the face of the sun) during its last transit in 2004

On the off-chance you’re awake before 5am on June 6 this year and the weather’s clear, you’ll be able to see a small black spot moving across the face of the sun, the planet Venus.

Miss it and you won’t have another chance, because it won’t happen again until 2117.

The Transit of Venus occurs only every 105 or 122 years. Having waited so long, it then happens twice in eight years. The last time was 2004.

There wasn’t one at all in the 20th Century.

In 1716, the great British astronomer Edmond Halley predicted the next transit would be in 1761. Already 60 years old, he knew he wouldn’t see it, but suggested that if his successors measured the exact time that Venus entered and left the sun, a duration of roughly six hours, from locations as far apart as possible, the resulting data would enable them to calculate the distance from the Earth Things To Do In Pondicherry the sun and the size of the solar system.

It would also provide huge benefits to mapping and navigation.

The idea was enthusiastically taken up by the French Academy, who organised an international effort in 1761.

Scientists travelled thousands of miles, lugging equipment weighing more than half a ton, risking and sometimes suffering death – the first ever example of global scientific co-operation, all in an age when the journey from London to Newcastle took six days.

Not only that but the Seven Years War was still in progress, making travel so risky that Britain’s Royal Society was advised to send two scientists to each location, travelling in different ships, in case one was attacked.

105: The number of years before the next transit of Venus

This actually happened to two British astronomers, Mason and Dixon (later famous for drawing the line between the U.S.

north and south which bears their name). Four days out of England en route to India, their ship was fired upon by a French frigate which shot away its mast.

The French boarded, a fierce battle ensued and the decks ran with blood.

Eventually the French were repulsed and the ship limped back into port. Mason and Dixon were naturally not too willing to try again until compelled to do so by threat of prosecution for mutiny by the Royal Society.

The first scientist to set off, heading for the French held port of Pondicherry in India, was the Frenchman Guillaume Le Gentil.

By the time he arrived, the British had captured Pondicherry and he was forced to watch the transit of Venus from his ship, rendering accurate measurements impossible.

Another Frenchman, Chappe d’Auteroche, was sent to Siberia, a 4,000-mile journey.

It took him months to reach St Petersburg with 1,800 miles still to go, having suffered many carriage crashes. At one point it was so cold his coachman ran away.

The eventual results were disappointingly inaccurate, putting the distance to the Sun at anywhere between 77,100,000 and 98,700,000 miles.

For the next transit, in 1769, British astronomer Nevil Maskelyne ran the show.

There was a huge international effort with Russia’s Catherine the Great alone sending teams to eight locations. Britain sent Captain Cook to the virtually unexplored Tahiti.

Le Gentil, who had hung around south-east Asia for eight years waiting for the second transit, was again frustrated – the weather was cloudy and he saw nothing.

Having had enough of the cold in Siberia, his rival Chappe d’Auteroche went to Mexico and was the only astronomer to observe both transits completely.

Unfortunately his location was a typhus-riddled village – he caught the illness and died, but not before he’d processed his results.

When the results were collated, the final calculation of 93,726,900 miles was less than 1per cent out from today’s figure, an incredible achievement given the difficulties involved.

A by-product was that the various scientific expeditions also discovered new species, made geological surveys and drew new maps. (Cook made his measurements in Tahiti, then went on to discover Australia before heading home.)

The scientific expedition was born and the practice of scientists of different countries working together, putting knowledge above national quarrels, became a template for the future that endures today.

Andrea Wulf’s story of the chase is an enthralling, nail-biting thriller and will undoubtedly prove one of the non-fiction books of the year.

Even if you fail to see the Transit, don’t miss this wonderful book.

National Parks In India – A Guide

Nagarhole National Park
Nagarhole National Park (now also known as the Rajiv Gandhi National Park) is part of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, India’s largest stretch of protected forest, including besides, neighbouring sanctuaries of Bandipur, Mudumalai and Wynaad.

Established in 1955 as a wildlife sanctuary, Nagarhole was designated a national park in 1975. The park today stretches in a series of gentle hills and valleys, over an expanse of 640 sq km, north of the river Kabini. The park is centred around a perennial water reservoir formed in 1974, when the Kabini River was dammed. 
Nagarhole’s vegetation is different from Bandipur’s dry scrub- moist deciduous forests, including bamboo, teak, eucalyptus and cassia, cover much of the sanctuary, providing a refuge for a wide range of animals and birds.

Nagarhole has all the resident wildlife of the Nilgiri hills: Nilgiri tahr, Nilgiri langur, bison, leopard, Asian elephant, wild boar, deer, dhole (wild dog) and porcupine, besides tigers. A high canopy of trees- up to thirty metres tall in some places- harbours rare birds such as the endangered Malabar trogon, the Malabar pied hornbill and the crested hawk-eagle.


Area : 640 sq km
Best time to visit : October to March
Prominent Fauna : Nilgiri tahr, Nilgiri langur, bison, leopard, Asian elephant, wild boar, deer, dhole (wild dog) and porcupine, besides tigers.
How to Reach : The major railhead closest to Nagarhole is Mysore, 80 km away, with train connections to a large number of towns and cities across India.

Bangalore, with excellent air and rail links to the rest of the country, is 220 km from Nagarhole, Ooty is about 240 km from the park. Buses connect Nagarhole to Bangalore (about 6 hours) and to a network of other towns across Karnataka district list, Tamilnadu and Kerala.

You can hire a vehicle in one of the town – Bangalore is very convenient to reach Nagarhole.
Game viewing in the park, You can hire jeep or ride on an elephants back for to view wildlife.   Elephant is best way to get deep into the jungle.
Where to stay : Nagarhole has variouse accommodation options available.

Bandhavgarh National Park
Bandhavgarh National Park is one of the largest national parks in India located in the Umaria district of Madhya Pradesh. Bandhavgarh was declared a national park in 1968 with an area of 105 km². The buffer is spread over the forest divisions of Umaria and Katni and totals 437 km².

The park derives its name from the most prominent hillock of the area, which is said to be given by Hindu Lord Rama to his brother Laxman to keep a watch on Lanka (Ceylon). Hence the name Bandhavgarh (Sanskrit: Brother’s Fort).

This park has a large biodiversity. The density of the tiger population at Bandhavgarh is one of the highest known in India. The park has a large breeding population of panthers, bisons and various species of deer. The region once had a large population of white tigers.

Maharaja Martand Singh of Rewa captured the last known in 1951. This white tiger, Mohan, is now stuffed and on display in the palace of the Maharajas of Rewa.

Bharatpur Forest
The government run Bharatpur Forest Lodge is located within the vicinity of Keoladeo National Park that lies 190-kms from Delhi and 55-kms from Agra in Rajasthan.

Accommodation Facilities
17 excellent air conditioned rooms with attached bathrooms as well as hot and cold running water facility.

Other Services
» Cycle-rickshaws and bicycles for park trips.
» Guides for bird watching are provided at an extra cost.
» A stand-by generator.

Periyar National Park
Periyar is a protected area, and a Project Tiger nature reserve in the South Indian State of Kerala, set high in the mountains of the Western Ghats at the border to Tamil Nadu. It lies in the districts of Idukki and Pathanamthitta.

The protected area covers an area of 777 km², out of which a 350 km² part of the core zone was made into the Periyar National Park and Tiger Reserve, sometimes dubbed the Periyar Wildlife Sanctuary. The park is often called by the name thekkady also. Thekkady is located four km from Kumily, approximately 100 km east of Alappuzha, 110 km west of Madurai and 120 km southeast from Kochi.

Pench National Park
The Pench National Park is located in northwestern Maharastra in India, about 70 km from the city of Nagpur. Spread over an area of 275 km², 10% area of the park is in Maharastra rest 90% of area is in the neighbouring state of Madhya Pradesh.

The vegetation here is typical of the southern tropical deciduous forest. The best time to visit the park is between February and April. The common animals which can be seen are the gaur, sambhars, blue bulls, macaque, langur, wild boar, bears and wild dogs and the Park is well-known for its deers and leopards.

A few tigers and civets can also be spotted sometimes.

The Park is open to visitors between 6 AM to 10:30AM in the morning and 3 PM to 6 PM in the evening. The park remains closed during the months of July, August and September. It can be accessed by road as well as railway. The nearest rail-head is at Ramtek and a bus can be taken for the next 35 km to the Park.

Other important natural forests in Maharashtra like the Nagzira Sanctuary and the Navegaon National Park are also close to Pench.


Rajaji National Park
Rajaji National Park is an Indian national park that encompasses the Shivaliks, near the foothills of the Himalayas. It is spread over 820 sq. km.[1], and three districts of Uttarakhand: Haridwar, Dehradun and Pauri Garhwal.

In 1983, three wildlife sanctuaries in the area namely, Chilla, Motichur and Rajaji sanctuaries were merged into one [1].

Rajaji National Park has been named after C. Rajagopalachari (Rajaji), a prominent leader of the Freedom Struggle, the second and last Governor-General of independent India and one of the first recipients of India’s highest civilian award Bharat Ratna (in 1954).

Kanziranga National Park
Kaziranga situated in Assam State of North India is a title of a remarkable success of conservation of the One Horned Rhinoceros and a number of other wild animals in the North East India. It is homeland of the Great Indian One Horned Rhinoceros and other wild lives.

Kaziranga is one of the significant natural habitat for in situ conservation of biological biodiversity of universal value and this made Kaziranga National Park to get inscribed in the World Heritage Site List 1985.

The Kaziranga National Park area consists of 429.93 Sq.Km. with an additional area of 429.40 Sq.Km. and situated in the two districts of Assam, namely Golaghat and Nagaon. The total area of the park within Nagaon district is 175 Sq.Km., out of which 135 Sq.Km. falls under Bagori Forest Range office and 40 Sq.Km.

falls within Ghorakati Forest Range office.

Ranthambore National Park
Ranthambore National park in Rajasthan is famous for its tigers and is one of the best places in the country to see these majestic animal in wild. A good time to visit between October and May when the nature of the dry deciduous forests makes sightings common. The Park covers an area of nearly 400 sq.

km. and is set between the Aravali and Vindhya hill ranges. The varied topography of the national park is home to animals like the jackal,mongoose, sloth bear, leopard, and of course, the tiger. Ranthambore can offer you a lot more than the wild life Holiday excursions and vacations to Ranthambore National park.

There are number of more National Parks in India where you can sight rich wildlife of India.

Mail us to book Your wildlife Holidays in India : mktg@discoveryfullcircle.com

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